I did it again!: The North Texas Wine and Brew Music Festival and My Second Vendor Booth Experience

I just attended my second festival this year as a vendor! My first one was the Rockwall Comic Fest, which was an awesome entry into the world of selling artwork in person. It was free, the crowd was exactly my demographic (book nerds), and, as a school fair, it was low pressure.

The North Texas Wine and Brew Music Festival was the next step up. I had to rent a space, I had no clue about the crowd other than that they loved drinking and music, and it was expected to have thousands of attendants. It was also their first year to hold the event, so there was the added risk that something would fall through. But, man. It worked out. And I’m so glad I did it. Here’s how it all went down.

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Kids Say the Darndest Things, including Found Poetry

Found poetry is magic. It is when commonplace words and text reveal themselves as poetry. A classic example is this piece by William Carlos Williams:

This is just to say

I have eaten
the plums
that were in
the icebox

and which
you were probably
saving
for breakfast

Forgive me
they were delicious
so sweet
and so cold

**Note: I think this was just written in the style of found poetry, as if it were written on a note in the kitchen. But you get the idea. (Aside: This poem annoys my students like no other. They cannot accept it as a poem and it is hilarious to see them so angry about poetry!)

This street art counts:

So does this passive aggressive Facebook post by a relative, posted after a family event…

That I turned into this:

Some family pictures
are very confusing.
Those who don’t
like each other
pose and smile,
hugging.

When I searched for other examples of “found poetry,” I was overwhelmed by teaching resources that somehow confused found poetry with blackout poetry. Allow me to differentiate:

Found poetry: Text/language that wasn’t meant to be poetic (i.e., speech, a Tweet, an advertisement, etc.) reveals poetic elements. My favorite is when the original message hasn’t been changed, just formatted into the broken lines of poetry. The Wikipedia page for found poetry has a few speeches that were converted into poetry.

Blackout poetry: Drawing on a printed page of prose to reveal poetry within the page. This requires deletion of words and manipulation of the original message. The best blackout poetry somehow highlights a thematic idea that aligns with the original text. For example:

Blackout poetry is often used in grade school poetry lessons because kids feel it is easier to “create” poetry if all one has to do is find it on the page. Plus, engaging in visual arts gives them a chance to see the art in poetry.

Both require finding poetry, and are therefore magical in their own way. To me, the beauty of poetry is in putting words—beautiful ones, simple ones, ones that you never would have imagined—to the complexity of human experience. I love that poetry is—as Ralph Fletcher describes it—a “fresh” way of looking at our boring world, that thus forces us to perceive our reality with new eyes. Both found and blackout poetry do that. I prefer found poetry because the words and message are kept in their original form, just reformatted to highlight their beauty.

Now that that’s out of the way, here’s the real reason I decided to muse on found poetry today…

My two-year-old says the cutest things. She’s finally at the point where she can say complete sentences, even some compound ones. She also loves demanding that I pick her up and run through the house, as if I were a horse. Quite exhausting, might I add.

The other day, she climbed on me, commanded me to run, and pointed out the path I should take through the house.

The front room was dark. The blinds were closed, and it was a cloudy day.

“Oh no, it’s dark in there,” she said. But she insisted. “We run through the dark!”

I loved her determination and courage in that moment. To me, that’s poetry. A wild child riding her mom and demanding that we both run through that which scares us.

And so I had to create this:

we run through the dark digital chalkboard art by swapna gardner nerdladydraws

May you run through whatever darkness you face today… and possibly find some poetry along the way.

Book Review: One Day in December

You Might Like This Book If You Like…

  • Other titles from Reese’s Book Club
  • Holiday movies, or British movies, or British holiday movies like Love Actually and Bridget Jones’s Diary
  • Stories that deal with twenty-something problems
  • Romances that have mature character development, showing characters growing over time and dealing with more than just their romantic woes
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Inertia and Creativity

Ever since I learned the term from Bill Nye the Science Guy, I have loved the concept of inertia as stated in Newton’s First Law:

An object at rest stays at rest and an object in motion stays in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force 

(Source: Physics Classroom)

I’ve loved it because it is so true in life–not just in terms of physics, but in terms of motivation, goal-setting, and goal-getting. 

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