Literary Whiteboard Lettering, Weeks 9-10 (HALLOWEEN EDITION!)

October’s been all about monsters and stories that give you the heebie jeebies! What are you reading for Halloween?

Day 31: The Fall of the House of Usher

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Publication: 1839 (short story)

What It’s About: The narrator visits his ill friend, Roderick Usher. Usher and his sister live alone in a huge, rotten, creepy house. It feels very similar to the film Crimson Peak. My Gothic lit classes have covered this work to see an example of a classic Gothic setting, one which is still seen in today’s horror works: an expansive, but enclosed, space with several nooks and crannies for creepy ghouls and secrets to lurk. *shudder*

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Day 32: The Most Dangerous Game

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Publication: 1924 (short story)

What It’s About: Sanger Rainsford washes up on an uncharted island and finds that its resident, General Zaroff, hunts people. Zaroff invites Rainsford to join him in his “game.” I’ve taught this work several times, but Zaroff’s explanation of his sport still gives me the chills.

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Day 33: Beowulf

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Publication: 700-1000 (epic poem, told orally); 975-1010 (date of manuscript)

What It’s About: A classic hero’s tale, this epic poem recounts the adventures of Beowulf as he battles 3 monsters: Grendel, Grendel’s mother, and a dragon. This work is often studied as an example of the effect of the Christianisation on pagan literature.

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Day 34: A Monster Calls

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Publication: 2011 (YA novel)

What It’s About: A child struggles with coping with his mother’s losing battle with cancer by day, and faces a monster that sweeps him out of his room by night. If you read this story, you must get the illustrated edition by Jim Kay. The artwork is absolutely amazing!

I could not find a free version of this book online.

Day 35: The Divine Comedy

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Publication: 1472 (narrative poem)

What It’s About: Dante makes himself the main character as he travels through all the levels of hell, purgatory, and heaven in this allegorical tale of man’s journey to God. Most students study only Inferno, the account of Hell, because… well, it’s Hell and it’s exciting!

Read Online (I love this resource for Dante!!)

Day 36: The Phantom of the Opera

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Publication: 1910 (novel)

What It’s About: The Palais Garnier Opera House is said to be haunted by a killer ghost… but it’s actually a hideous but talented musician lurking in the shadows of the building. He preys on the young and impressionable Christine, who believes him to be the Angel of Music. The Phantom in the book is more murderous and less cuddly than the one in the musical.

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Day 37: Dracula

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Publication: 1897 (novel)

What It’s About: An Eastern European vampire wants to move to England to make a legion of vampires. I’m reading this book for the first time right now–so far, it develops a creepy mood beautifully. While looking up information on this book, I found that this is an example of invasion literature, a movement in British literature that popped up in the late 19th century leading up to WWI. I love seeing how political climates (in this case, the fear that outside forces will invade England and change English culture) influence the arts!

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These are part of my 2017-2018 project for my classroom: give book talks every day (or nearly every day), and letter a quote from each book on the board! I want to share examples of classic literature/good books with my students, with the hope that they’ll find beauty in words. Leave a comment if  you’ve got a good book suggestion!

Literary Whiteboard Lettering, Weeks 7-8

Over these weeks, I was transitioning from American regional works to embracing October and giving book talks about famous spooky stories. Stay tuned for weeks 9-10 for some fun books and stories for Halloween!

Day 25: All the Pretty Horses

This is still the only Cormac McCarthy book I have read, and I was surprised by it. After watching No Country for Old Men and The Road, I expected to read a sordid tale of cowboys. Instead, I found a romance written in a style reminiscent of Faulkner.

Day 26: All the Light We Cannot See

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The physics teacher had some qualms with this quote, but I still think it’s lovely. Although neither American nor horror, I suggested this work because many of my learners expressed an interest in WW2 and historical fiction.

Day 27: Rip Van Winkle

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I don’t think I would have known about this story if it weren’t for Wishbone. That adorable dog taught me a lot about major literary works, and unfortunately there’s no equivalent for kids today (that I know of). Hence, why I’m doing daily book talks.

Day 28: Joy Luck Club

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I hate that I had to rush this one. I love this line.

Day 29: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

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Yes, I recycled the “Washington Irving” lettering from two days ago… I’m a busy teacher! Lettering takes time!

Day 30: Frankenstein

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Did you know that Mary Shelley created this story as part of a spooky storytelling contest among her friends?